Why should I vaccinate my child when vaccines are not 100% effective and don't always last a lifetime?

No vaccine is 100% effective. Most childhood vaccines are effective in 85-95% of recipients. In the US and Plumas County, more people are vaccinated than are not, though that could change.

Example:

  • If in a high school of 1,000, all but 5 kids are vaccinated against measles and all the children are exposed to an outbreak, the 5 unvaccinated will be infected. Of the 995 remaining students that have been vaccinated, let's say less than 1% or 7 students, did not respond to the vaccination. They will get ill also. So, 12 kids got sick. If nobody in the class got vaccinated, there probably would have been 1,000 cases of measles. With a risk of the following complications:
    • 6 cases of pneumonia
    • 1 encephalitis
    • 2 deaths

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1. I have heard vaccines are more dangerous than the diseases they protect against. Isn't it safer for my child to get the disease?
2. Can vaccines cause encephalitis (brain inflammation) and other severe consequences?
3. If vaccines are safe, why has the federal government paid more than $2 billion to children and adults injured by vaccines?
4. Is it possible that aluminum in vaccines could be harmful to normal, healthy babies?
5. Is it true many as 50% of vaccines used in the U.S. contain mercury, which has been linked in the media with autism?
6. I have heard about the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS). Does this mean there are more dangers from vaccines than are being reported to VAERS?
7. Why should I vaccinate my child when vaccines are not 100% effective and don't always last a lifetime?
8. Is it difficult to get legal exemptions to vaccination for school enrollment?